Easy make ahead turkey gravy recipe

Gravy…the crown jewel…the holy grail…the goodness. We always run out…never have enough…and it prompted me to solve this gravy problem once and for all. (all sounds so serious…huh…well it is…we are talking about GRAVY…:) easy make ahead gravy recipe @cleverlyinspired (1)

 

It is a favorite at our Thanksgiving meal…and I wanted to be able to make some extra…but not under the gun of serving the meal. There are a few steps….but they are easy and foolproof. This make ahead gravy can be made up to 3 days ahead of your meal. It heats up great-and when your bird is done cooking…you can pour the pan juices right in and it blends in perfect. More gravy=goodness ;)

I realize Thanksgiving is over….but I know many who serve turkey again for Christmas…so I thought you may like to try this for those occasions.

easy make ahead gravy recipe @cleverlyinspired (2)

easy make ahead gravy recipe @cleverlyinspired (4)

  • 3 pounds turkey drumsticks or wings (any dark meat poultry will do…I used chicken legs)
  • 2 ribs celery, cut into 2-inch lengths
  • 2 medium carrots cut into 2-inch lengths
  • 6 large cloves garlic, unpeeled
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 8 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Heat the oven to 425 degrees. Combine the turkey, celery, carrots, garlic and thyme in a large roasting pan. Toss with the olive oil and roast, stirring occasionally, until the meat is browned and the vegetables are caramelized, about 1 hour.
    Transfer the contents of the pan to a large soup pot. Add the bay leaf, onion, chicken broth and cold water; bring to a boil. Meanwhile, place the roasting pan over medium heat and add the wine. Bring to a simmer, scraping up the browned bits with a spatula; pour liquid into the pot. Reduce heat and simmer gently until the stock is reduced to 5 cups, about 1-1/2 hours.
    Strain the stock into a large bowl, pressing on the vegetables to extract as much liquid as possible. Refrigerate until the fat rises to the surface and congeals, about 2 hours. (The stock can be made up to two days in advance and kept refrigerated until ready to use. Or, make the stock, chill completely, and freeze for up to two months.)
    Skim the fat off the stock and transfer 6 tablespoons of the fat to a medium saucepan set over medium heat. When the fat is sizzling, add the flour and whisk constantly for 1-1/2 minutes. Gradually whisk in the turkey stock, a little at a time, letting the roux fully absorb the liquid before adding more (don’t worry that the stock is cold and spoonable; it will instantly liquefy once it hits the hot pan). Bring gravy to a simmer and cook until thickened and bubbly, 20 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Cool completely, cover and refrigerate for up to two days or freeze for up to three months (let it thaw in the refrigerator for one day).
    On the big day: Reheat the gravy in a saucepan set over medium heat until simmering. You can add up to 1 cup of the pan drippings from your roasted turkey to the gravy. To do so, strain the pan drippings into a glass measuring cup, skim off the clear fat that rises to the surface, and discard. Whisk 1 cup of the drippings into the gravy and simmer until reduced slightly, about 10 minutes. (If you prefer thicker gravy, make a slurry by mixing a few tablespoons of flour with an equal amount of cold water. Add to the gravy and simmer until thickened, 20 minutes.)

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-Tracie
About Tracie

Tracie Stoll is a wife, mom and has a passion for creating new things. On her blog Cleverlyinspired.com she is constantly sharing ways to inspire her readers to be clever in their own home. Since 2010 Tracie has been sharing DIY projects, crafting, remodeling and decorating along with some easy tasty recipes...all on a mindful budget. She is a graduate of the University of Dayton where she studied visual art and communications. Tracie has been featured on popular sites such as Better Homes and Gardens, Huffington Post, Apartment Therapy, Seventeen and Design Sponge.

Comments

  1. Looks yummy!